Carers

A carer is someone who unpaid and regardless of their age, cares for someone who is disabled, ill or elderly.  Anyone can be a carer, including those who are under 18 years of age (these are known as young carers).

A carer carries out tasks for someone who is unable to manage on their own. This can include things such as bathing, shopping and dressing. There is help available for carers which can include financial support, practical support, employment rights at work, help with providing care, as well as local carer's support groups.  The various types of support that you may be entitled to are outlined below:-

Carer's Allowance - This is the main form of financial benefit available to carers. To be eligible for Carer's Allowance, you must be over 16 years of age and:

  • Care for someone who is receiving a qualifying disability benefit, for at least 35 hours a week
  • Be resident in the UK
  • Should earn £110 or less per week after deductions
  • Not be in receipt of certain benefits.  Some benefits however may entitle you to an extra premium on top of your carer's allowance so please take advice before claiming.
  • Not in full time education

Employment rights for Carers - It can be difficult to combine caring for someone with having a job and some even have to give up working in order to care for someone full time. However, as part of the Work and Families Act 2006, and the Employment Rights Act 1996, carers who are employees have the right to flexible working hours and time off at short notice.

Young Carers - Your local council has a responsibility to ensure that your duties as a carer do not interfere with your education, development, and overall quality of life. They must also ensure that you do not become trapped in your role as a carer.

Help and support

The following advice may be useful in enabling you to get the help and support that you need as a carer.

  • Tell others that you are a carer - healthcare professionals, employer, family and friends, local social services.
  • Have a carer's assessment - this will be undertaken by your local social services. You should be offered this as soon as it appears to them that you may have needs for support (or are likely to do so in the future).  You also have the legal right to an assessment and can request one at any point from the local council.
  • Claim your financial benefits - you may be entitled to receive financial support in the form of Carer's Allowance
  • Contact your nearest carers group or centre - they can offer support, information, advice and a way to meet and socialise with other people in the area who are also carers

Click here for further information on Carers.

For further information on Carers and the help on offer, click on the websites below:-

  • Carers Wales - help individuals that care for their family or friends
  •  Gov.uk - provides information on a number of topics relating to carers and the help available
  • Young Carers - a website where young carers can chat to other young carers, share their stories and get support
  • Welsh Government, Carers - provides information on carers and the support available
  • Young Carers Tool Kit - aimed at professionals across Health, Education and Social Services
  • Carers Rights Guide - the Carers Rights Guide is here to outline your rights as a carer. and to give you the full picture of the practical and financial support available.
  • Carer's Allowance - carer's allowance is the main benefit for carers.
  • Working with carers - information on social care legislation in Wales.
  • Upfront - this is a simple tool for carers who are new to the maze of benefits and entitlements.  Fill in your details, spend a couple of minutes answering questions and we'll guide you to the information you need.
  • Dewis Cymru - looking after friends and family